Things that have me excited for the Daredevil relaunch – Part 8

On the surface, this post might seem to be devoted to something as trivial as caption boxes, but it’s really more about what’s written in the boxes and the big smashing return of the internal monologue.

You see, while there were some definite highlights during Diggle’s run, particularly in the earlier issues, the use of captions or other similar storytelling devices, to let us peer into the mind of Matt Murdock, seemed to fall by the wayside the more Daredevil fell under the possession of The Beast. I’m sure there was a point to this, but I really missed the first person perspective that had been so common during Brubaker’s run (I know some even felt he overused the first person narrative voice). However, from the looks of things, Matt is ready to start thinking “out loud” again and I’m more than ready to hear what he has to say.

A collage of images containing first person narrative caption boxes

Of course, what I find exciting about this isn’t just the mere presence of “Matt’s voice” in these preview pages, but the fact that it seems, in my mind anyway, that Waid has him down perfectly. Based on just these few pages, I was able to let out a deep sigh of relief. Here was the character I recognized, the one I’ve come to enjoy so very much, sounding like himself again.

I know that if these few pages are any indication, we’re off to a very good start to the relaunch and it seems that the promise of a character-driven book (see part 2 of this series) is one that Waid & Co. should be more than able to deliver on. That’s something to look forward to as we’re now less than 72 hours away from the U.S. release of Daredevil #1. But, who’s counting? 😉

Christine Hanefalk

Christine Hanefalk

Based in Stockholm, Sweden, Christine is a die-hard Daredevil fan who launched The Other Murdock Papers in 2007 to share her passion for Matt Murdock and his friends with other fans.

1 comment

  1. The interior monologue is also good for letting we readers know how Matt ‘sees’ each scene. The literal description compliments the visual art to convey the meaning of the whole scene. Plus, it adds a nifty pulp element to the book by hearing his thoughts. It’s good to see he’s got his wit and humour back.

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